Damp Dogs & Rabbit Wee

Today’s post has been written by author Cee Tee Jackson, who has kindly shared the story behind his book, perfect for dog lovers. Enjoy!

Being made redundant any time is unfortunate; life changing. Twice in two years, though? Why, that’s just plain careless, and points to poor decision making, particularly as regards the latter job. I know. It happened to me. And as an ex-Bank manager seeking employment as the financial sector crashed, a prolonged period on Jobseeker Allowance followed.

Eventually though, almost as much through desperation as my love for animals, I started my own petcare / dog walking business. That was over eight years ago and illustrates perfectly that some things are just meant to be. I love my job.

Marley - Damp Dog 800

My days are spent principally outdoors and encompass moments of laughter; concern; confusion; emergency, smells and mess. I experience situations that educate, plus some that warm my heart, while others can almost break it.

I’m also very interested in music and for many years interviewed and wrote features on new bands for a national music magazine in addition to my own ‘Loud Horizon’ music blog. As I’d always planned on writing a book, a comedic fantasy, I thought it would first be a good exercise to try writing about something I knew well – my job.

There was no initial intention to publish the book. However the feedback I was continually receiving from the various writing sites I showcased and edited on, encouraged me to do so. ‘Damp Dogs & Rabbit Wee,’ is the result.

Published at the beginning of August 2015, it has already been stocked by Dunbartonshire Libraries. Readers have commented that it is both humorous and compassionate. You decide:

…………… We entered the park at the point where the local kids were jumping off the rocks into the icy, but calm river. They were naturally blissfully unaware of Marley’s impending whirlwind arrival. Had they known he was fast approaching, they surely wouldn’t have been so careless as to leave their outer clothing so close to the path.
By the time I breathlessly caught up to Marley, there was something hanging from the corner of his mouth. He sat there, a look of proud, self-satisfaction on his face, while exuding an innocent air of:
‘What, me?’
If dogs could whistle, I imagine he’d have been casually doing so while avoiding direct eye contact with me.
I managed to open his jaws and found to my horror that he’d picked up and half eaten some lad’s football sock, leaving just three inches of it trailing from the side of his mouth. I started gently pulling. Gradually, like a magician drawing a line of knotted handkerchiefs from a top-hat, I succeeded in retrieving the saliva-soaked sock from the back of Marley’s throat.
By now, a crowd of laughing youngsters had gathered round.
“Erm, sorry about that,” I sheepishly offered to the sock’s owner, handing it to him by my finger-tips.
Exit stage left.

…………… But no matter how hard I tried to remain stoical, I couldn’t help but think:
“That’s the last time he’ll paddle in the river.” “That’s the last time he’ll fetch a stick.” “That’s the last time he’ll pee up against that tree.”
Can dogs sense impending death? Can they sense their own death? I don’t think Oscar could. Taking him for a walk with his pals that day was most certainly a good move.
I dropped him back at his house, gave him a biscuit treat and a quick cuddle, said ‘goodbye’ and returned to my van. Sometimes being ‘in’ on a secret can be difficult. I couldn’t hang around in case my emotions transmitted to Oscar.

‘Damp Dogs & Rabbit Wee,’ is available through Amazon in both Kindle and paperback formats.

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